Just don’t

international-womens-day
Just say no!

Just do it!

Just in time!

All mottos or sayings that we’ve read, used or heard hundreds of time. Memorable yes, within context but I want you to just say no to just.

Often our female urge to minimize is apparent in our speech patterns. “I just wanted to touch base.” “Just a minute.” “Just a quick note to . . .”

Stop the minimizing and drop the just from your written and verbal communication.

You don’t have to justify speaking when you stand to give your elevator pitch. You don’t “just do this” or “just help people by doing that.”

Stand tall, breathe deeply and then proudly announce to the world that you “ . . . “ fill in the blank without using the word just.

Same with emails. How many have you received that started: “I just wanted to ensure . . .“ or “I’m just following up . . . “

I know it’s hard; I’m guilty, too. We don’t want to be perceived as being too pushy, too ‘out there’ or too demanding.

As women, we are the organizers, the peace makers, the calm before the storm. But standing up for oneself in the form of forthright language is important, especially on International Women’s Day. Standing up and speaking one’s peace without apology, even if it’s a hesitant, undercover one like using the world just – just demeans us.

No more just justifying!

Personal PR

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Is a pushy co-worker messing with your #PersonalPR? A listener emailed Lisa Brandt on First Thing at CJBK asking about a colleague who habitually uses work time to socialize, preventing her from completing her job tasks.

Listen here to learn how Lisa, Scott Pettigrew and I hash out this workplace dilemma.

Shooting from the lip

Donald Trunp

Have you been targeted by a bully or a troll on social media? Or are you a bully who targets others . . . need to think about that last one? You couldn’t be a bully, right? You’re a nice person? Well if you make provocative statements meant to pull someone into a heated exchange in a public forum, like Facebook, then you could be a bully.
Some public figures (Donald Trump) use off-hand comments to disparage others and then back off with the excuse that “I didn’t mean it that way.” Is this bullying speech?
Shooting from the lip can be fun but it can be a dangerous thing to someone who values his/her personal brand and Lisa Brandt and I talked about this last week on First Thing on CJBK’s Personal PR segment and we’d love to know your thoughts on how you’d handle this type of situation.


Using the principles of PR in everyday life

Large companies have public relations departments to handle their communication crises, but regular folks don’t.
Often they are caught in a dilemma of thinking: ‘what do I say in this situation?’ or ‘how should I respond to that?’
Without the skills to write nuanced copy or craft the perfect verbal response, they can be caught short and end up looking bad.
Thursday mornings at 7:20 a.m., Jill Ellis-Worthington, Chief Communicator for Write.On Communication Services, chats with Lisa Brandt on First Thing, CJBK’s morning drive show to discuss how to handle Personal PR problems.
Jill helps listeners with their communication issues by applying the principles of PR to life’s sticky moments.

Personal PR

What do you say when you’re in a group and the conversation turns a bit ugly? People start making derogatory remarks about others of different races or gender identifications or sexual preferences. They start disparaging others with no regard to the general feeling of the group.

What do you say? Do you speak up and risk centering yourself out or are you quiet and let it pass without comment, risking your integrity?

It’s a tough question because sometimes you need to go along to get along but when isenough and when should you speak up?

How can you handle it differently, perhaps with a bit of humor or by letting your feet do your talking?

Lisa Brandt and I talked about this last week on First Thing on CJBK’s Personal PR segment and we’d love to know your thoughts on how you’d handle this type of situation.

Using the principles of PR in everyday life

Large companies have public relations departments to handle their communication crises, but regular folks don’t.

Often they are caught in a dilemma of thinking: ‘what do I say in this situation?’ or ‘how should I respond to that?’

Without the skills to write nuanced copy or craft the perfect verbal response, they can be caught short and end up looking bad.

Thursday mornings at 7:20 a.m., Jill Ellis-Worthington, Chief Communicator for Write.On Communication Services, chats with Lisa Brandt on First Thing, CJBK’s morning drive show to discuss how to handle Personal PR problems.

Jill helps listeners with their communication issues by applying the principles of PR to life’s sticky moments.

Personal PR

LE-03282016-dogs-for-VB--8-
Summer time means time to be out and about in our yards and interacting with neighbours can be a bit dicey from time to time.

What do you say to a neighbour with a constantly barking dog? How do you handle it if your neighbour complains about your dog?

The guys next door have constant parties; how do you react?

What do you say to others when your decision to put in a pool impacts them?

Ideas in this clip from last week during my conversation with Ryan Spence on CJBK.

 

Personal PR

photo credit: London Free Press

photo credit: London Free Press

London’s mayoral issues aren’t over. After a run of at least three mayors – Dianne Haskett, Anne Marie Decicco-Best and Joe Fontana – have all ended up in front of the press trying to explain themselves and their actions to the electorate.

Each did so in his or her own fashion, often with disastrous results for the city in national news.

Now, our fair city is again making national and international headlines and Mike Stubbs and I talked about how that’s being handled in our last two #PeronalPR spots.

Do you agree or disagree with the way Mayor Brown is handling the situation from a media relations stand point?

Personal PR

We write an email and hit send; the person receives it and responds with the info we need . . . or not.

Cyberspace is a strange place; we commit important documents, our schedules and lots of other necessary elements of modern life to it and then sit back and wait.

Not receiving an answer to emails or even knowing if the intended recipient got the email is frustrating but positive action can smooth the way.

I talked about this issue with Mike on First Thing with Mike Stubbs and Lisa Brandt on CJBK a few weeks ago. Listen and weigh-in on your take on handling this first world problem.

Personal PR

Since you’re the centre of the universe, it’s fine that you stop in the middle of a street, a grocery aisle or even at the top of the elevator to text  . . . right?

Have you ever seen any one pedexting (sometimes called wexting) and run into another person walking in the street or mall aisle? Have you been the person who was run into?

Have you seen someone crossing the street and pedexting in front of a driver making a left turn and almost been hit because he/she wasn’t looking at traffic?

Have you been that person, who is guilty of pedexting at the detriment to others?

Listen to Mike Stubbs and I chat about how such self-absorbed behaviour hurts ones brand in our #PersonalPR segment, heard Thursday mornings at 7:20 a.m. on CJBK’s First Thing with Mike Stubbs and Lisa Brandt.

 

Personal PR

Are you a Social Media oversharer? Or do you find it annoying when others are posting 50 times a day?FaceBook logo

From slicing up those who have to share daily pictures of their breakfast to decrying FB users who have to slag others or whine all the time, Mike Stubbs and I talk about the dos and don’ts of being a good FB friend.

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Large com­pa­nies have pub­lic rela­tions depart­ments to han­dle their com­mu­ni­ca­tion crises, but reg­u­lar folks don’t.

Often they are caught in a dilemma of think­ing: ‘what do I say in this sit­u­a­tion?’ or ‘how should I respond to that?’

With­out the skills to write nuanced copy or craft the per­fect ver­bal response, they can be caught short and end up look­ing bad.

Thurs­day morn­ings at 7:20 a.m., Jill Ellis-Worthington, Chief Com­mu­ni­ca­tor for Write.On Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Ser­vices, chats with Mike Stubbs on CJBK’s morn­ing drive show to dis­cuss how to han­dle Per­sonal PR problems.

Jill helps lis­ten­ers with their com­mu­ni­ca­tion issues by apply­ing the prin­ci­ples of PR to every day issues.

Personal PR

Parents arguing on the playground; hockey parents yelling at refs; a couple getting into it at the grocery story – What do you say when you feel compelled to intercede in a public display of anger or angst.

couple arguing near kids

 

I talk with Al Coombs on CJBK – when he was stepping in for Mike Stubbs on CJBK’s First Thing – with a few pointers on when and how to speak up when you feel compelled to intercede in someone else’s drama.

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Large com­pa­nies have pub­lic rela­tions depart­ments to han­dle their com­mu­ni­ca­tion crises, but reg­u­lar folks don’t.

Often they are caught in a dilemma of think­ing: ‘what do I say in this sit­u­a­tion?’ or ‘how should I respond to that?’

With­out the skills to write nuanced copy or craft the per­fect ver­bal response, they can be caught short and end up look­ing bad.

Thurs­day morn­ings at 7:20 a.m., Jill Ellis-Worthington, Chief Com­mu­ni­ca­tor for Write.On Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Ser­vices, chats with Mike Stubbs on CJBK’s morn­ing drive show to dis­cuss how to han­dle Per­sonal PR problems.

Jill helps lis­ten­ers with their com­mu­ni­ca­tion issues by apply­ing the prin­ci­ples of PR to every day issues.